Tuesday, July 25, 2017

The Great American Eclipse

Astronomers are calling it The Great American Eclipse. On August 21, 2017, an eclipse will start and end in Denver at 10:23:17am and 1:14:40pm respectively, with the mid-point being at 11:47:03am and covering 92% of the sun. This will be the first eclipse to span the entire continental United States in 99 years, starting on the Oregon coast, sweeping through the nation at a rapid 3000 miles per hour, and leaving the South Carolina coast an hour and a half later.

Hotels along the path of totality began receiving requests for reservations as long as 15 years ago from people anticipating this event. Roads are forecasted to be jam packed and slow on the day of the eclipse, so if you’re a pilot, you’ll probably be flying there instead. Aviation enthusiasts will be flocking to airports across the path of totality to watch from the wide open views they will most likely offer, with many of the airports hosting fly-ins, camping and/or even festivals.

Things you may need to know:

  1. Never look directly at the sun without special glasses. If you are in the path of totality, it’s ok to look at it without them when the moon has completely covered the sun.
  2. If you have plans to travel for the viewing, try not to do it the day of since many roads may be immobile.
  3. This event may break the internet. Billions of people will be flocking to the internet to view it on social media and other online sources.
  4. If you’re taking pictures, unless you have a special lens, your pictures of the sun may not turn out as well as you hope.

This eclipse even has its own website at greatamericaneclipse.com where you can find facts on the phenomena, a history of eclipses, where the best viewing spots are, and a store for memorabilia.

First Posted over here: The Great American Eclipse

Thursday, July 20, 2017

Do You Want To Get In the Saddle – Or Back In the Saddle?

Independence Aviation is a flight school that offers flight training, pilot mentoring, pilot services, aircraft management, hangar management and more in a friendly environment. You will find that experienced Cirrus Training instructors love what they do.  Below is a great story we thought we would share with you to inspire the pilot within.

Back In the Saddle

A rusty pilot regains his currency in a whole new world of aviation.

Pilot Jeff Berlin hadn’t flown a Cirrus SR22 for about a year, and before that quick round trip from Los Angeles to San Diego and back he hadn’t flown one for at least two years prior.

TOMATO FLAMES? Are you kidding? I’m sitting with my friend and CFI Paul Sallach in the restaurant at the Inn at Furnace Creek in Death Valley, California, nibbling on a turkey BLT while doing the ground portion of my flight review, what people used to call a biannual flight review. All is well thus far. I know my airspace and cloud clearances. I know what I need to know about sunset, sunrise and the beginning and end of civil twilight. And I’ve got all the buttons, switches and functions of the Cirrus Perspective by Garmin avionics suite dialed in. But TOMATO FLAMES? Seriously?   Keep reading….

If you have an interest in becoming a pilot, whether it is for a career or pleasure, Independence Aviation is here for you.  The instructors are some of the finest and will share their love of flying and experience with you, so you can become a licensed pilot.

Article Source right here: Do You Want To Get In the Saddle – Or Back In the Saddle?